Tag Archives: Xanax

Xanax and Alcohol

Xanax-and-Alcohol

With Xanax (a brand name for Alprazolam) one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in the U.S., it’s understandable that it’s mixed with other substances.  Some people do so without knowing how substances interact, while others are hoping to intensify effects or offset certain side effects. For example, Alcohol depresses the Central Nervous System (CNS), and while it can provide an initial buzz it also eventually causes drowsiness. Subsequently, people will mix it with stimulants, like cocaine to offset feeling sleepy. Polysubstance abuse is the abuse of 3 or more substances, often involving alcohol. It’s common for people to mix Xanax, alcohol and a third substance if not more. Neither substance is necessarily a bad thing, but they are both frequently misused and together can cause negative effects.

Alcohol is a popular drink around the world. The general acceptance of alcohol use, and heavy alcohol consumption, makes it difficult for a lot of people to recognize when use has turned to abuse, dependence, and addiction. As not everyone fully understands the negative effects of alcohol, they might not realize how dangerous it can be to mix Xanax and alcohol.

What is Alcohol?

The type of alcohol that humans drink is ethyl alcohol.The history of human’s interactions with alcohol is long and complicated. While the way it’s made and how it affects people has changed, it’s something that’s been around for thousands of years. Over time, as people learned more about the dangers of alcohol, there have been periods where it was banned, like Prohibition in the U.S. Some countries ban the use of it entirely or specific groups within countries ban the use. In a lot of countries today alcohol use is widespread and socially acceptable. Many recognize the dangers, but few realize how little it takes to experience dangerous effects or for it to turn to abuse. 

A lot of people know that it’s possible to have an addiction to alcohol. Still, they tend to have the image of the stereotypical drunk in mind: someone unable to do simple tasks, falling over in public, and generally incoherent. Furthermore, a lot of young people tend to engage in binge drinking with the assumption that they’re just young and doing what young people do. The 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), defines men’s binge drinking as five or more drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days. For women, it’s considered four or more drinks on the same occasion on at least 1 day in the past 30 days. Taking those numbers into consideration, the study also found, “In 2017, about 1 in 4 people aged 12 or older were current binge alcohol users.”

Effects of Alcohol Use

Many people know that alcohol is a depressant, which they understand to mean it causes depression. That is a possible side effect, but it is also a central nervous system depressant. 

This can include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Impaired cognitive function and coordination 
  • Lowered inhibition
  • Respiratory Depression
  • Coma 
  • Death

Xanax-and-Alcohol

Given the pervasiveness of alcohol consumption, and risky drinking in particular, it’s unfortunate that a lot of people don’t fully understand how it can negatively affect them. The National Cancer Institute cites strong scientific consensus showing clear evidence between alcohol consumption and various types of cancer. Furthermore, it’s possible for drinking excessively to lead to a weakened immune system leaving someone vulnerable to diseases. In addition to impairing cognitive function, the ability to think clearly and use coordination, it also causes issues with the heart, liver, and pancreas. 

In moderation, alcohol is not going to cause these symptoms and some believe there are benefits to occasional consumption. However, a lot of people, particularly starting in their youth, consume more than they should. Alcohol impairs decision making, which likely contributes to people’s decisions to mix substances. Others possibly consciously choose to mix substances in an attempt to enhance the experience of each substance.

Xanax Recreational Use

Xanax is a legal prescription drug for short-term use under medical supervision. It often treats anxiety and insomnia. Many providers consider it to have a high risk of misuse, due largely in part to dependence and addiction setting in quickly for a number of people. Xanax works by calming down an over-excited CNS and increasing dopamine in the brain. This provides a “Xanax High”, or a euphoric feeling that people desire when misusing Xanax. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) found that Xanax is one of the top three prescription drugs diverted to the illegal/illicit market. Most people using Xanax recreationally likely do not realize the serious long term effects of Xanax use. 

With Xanax, the brain adjusts and finds it difficult to adjust without it. Someone misusing Xanax is more likely to end up taking increased doses. They do so to continue to feel the same effects and to feel the euphoria or Xanax High they are chasing. Suddenly stopping often results in severe withdrawal symptoms, making it difficult to quit without professional help. It’s possible for withdrawal symptoms to last for months after ceasing use, making relapse more likely. Xanax depresses the CNS, often causing drowsiness, impairing motor and cognitive function, and slowed breathing. This is incredibly dangerous if mixed with other depressants.

Mixing Xanax and Alcohol

Mixing Xanax and alcohol isn’t going to result in overdose or death every time. Still, it’s a risk that isn’t worth it. Both can cause serious side effects apart from overdose or death. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), analyzed data from 2010 showing alcohol was involved in 27.2% of emergency department visits related to benzodiazepine (benzo) abuse. Further, of 1,512 benzo-related deaths that year, 324 also involved alcohol. Any death is clearly one too many.

Xanax-and-Alcohol-FAN

Both Xanax and alcohol are CNS depressants, which makes them dangerous when mixed. Some use Xanax and alcohol for sleep separately, but also try using them together. They both cause respiratory depression, or slowed breathing, which significantly increases the risk of overdose and death. Many people use alcohol as a means to help calm anxiety. It also can provide a euphoric high, or even simply an overall feeling of peace and happiness. A number of people will likely want to enhance the effects of Xanax and alcohol. They’re looking to feel something of a “Xanax and alcohol high”. Increasing consumption of both substances increases the risk of permanent damage, or of overdose or death. Adding any other substances further increases this risk. It’s unfortunately common for people to take opioids with benzos. This is a dangerous mix on its own and made even more dangerous with alcohol.

Treatment

For anyone using Xanax and alcohol, they likely need professional help. Xanax withdrawal is potentially severe and too difficult to do without proper help. Depending on severity of abuse and addiction, alcohol withdrawal is one of the few types of substances where withdrawal can result in severe complications or death. Anyone with a dependence or addiction to either substance, or especially both, should seek professional help. Reach out today for resources, support, and any help you might need.

Adderall and Xanax

adderall-and-xanax-fight-addiction-now

Mixing Substances – Adderall and Xanax

With substance abuse and addiction, it is common for people to use multiple substances. It’s possible for this to include someone using their own legally prescribed drugs, as well as many people illicitly using legal and illegal drugs. Abusing three or more is polysubstance abuse. Often, mixing substances heightens the negative effects of the other. In particular, if two substances are sedatives where side effects are commonly slowed or suppressed breathing this is especially dangerous. It’s important for people to always communicate with their medical providers any substances they are taking to be as safe as possible.

Unfortunately, many people abusing multiple substances do not communicate with medical professionals nor do they fully understand the risks of combining substances. A number of people use substances as a way to cope with problems or to chase a certain “high” they get, and possibly both. Adderall and Xanax are some of the most commonly prescribed prescription drugs. They are also frequently abused, with many people dealing with unintended consequences.

Xanax: Xanax Recreational Use and the Xanax High

Xanax is one of the brand names for the drug alprazolam, which is a benzodiazepine. It’s primary use is to treat anxiety and panic disorders. This is accomplished through suppression of the Central Nervous System (CNS). Dopamine is a naturally occurring chemical in the body and it is part of reward and motivation; Xanax works to increase levels of dopamine in the body. Subsequently, people are able to feel calm and peaceful. Many people feel a heightened sense of euphoria, or the “Xanax High”. This feeling is something that a lot of people want to recreate to the point where they begin to misuse Xanax. 

Xanax is a fast-acting drug: it’s processed quickly and leaves the body quickly. The Xanax High that users feel will not last long, which will leave them needing more, increasing the dosage, to continue feeling the same euphoria. It’s possible for addiction to set in quickly with Xanax, even under proper medical supervision. Dr. Philip R. Muskin states that addiction is possible within even the first week of use. According to one study, in 2013 there were 48 million prescriptions of alprazolam dispensed, despite most prescribers considering the misuse liability to be high. Furthermore, the study reveals that withdrawal is severe, even following guidelines, and is more severe than other benzodiazepines. Because of the risk of severe withdrawal symptoms, many people are unable to stop use without professional help.

Adderall

Adderall is a stimulant made from amphetamine, which is the parent drug of methamphetamine. It primarily treats attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy. It helps people concentrate, and is often abused by people seeking to use it to enhance concentration and performance. Like Xanax, people misuse it for the ability to experience a euphoric feeling. As with a number of prescription drugs, people make the assumption that misuse isn’t that bad if the drug is legal. According to Dr. Ramin Mojtabai, use “…can also cause sleep disruption and serious cardiovascular side effects, such as high blood pressure and stroke.” Adderall should only be used when prescribed and under medical supervision. 

  Side effects can include:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Headache
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Feveradderall-and-xanax-withdrawal

Withdrawal symptoms can include:

  • Depression
  • Insomnia
  • Nausea
  • Body aches

 

 

Mixing Adderall and Xanax

For some, their Adderall and Xanax use might start out with a prescription and then turn to Adderall or Xanax recreational use. For others, they only ever use it illicitly and may do so desiring to feel the Adderall or Xanax high. 

Often, people snort substances to feel the effects faster and stronger. With recreational use, snorting Xanax is something some turn to in order to feel it faster and attain a stronger high. However, snorting Xanax, or any substance, is harmful to the human body. According to Time, “Snorting powder of any kind can lead to inflammation of the nasal lining, infection in the lungs and blockages of respiratory tracts and nasal airways.” Just as with Xanax, snorting Adderall is something that users will do to drastically increase one’s performance and concentration. Snorting Adderall may also increase the euphoric feeling (“Adderall High”) that some users seek.

stimulants-and-depressants

Stimulants and Depressants

Adderall and Xanax on their own, used under medical supervision, are meant to help. Still, even used properly they do have a high risk of misuse. It’s important for patients and their providers to take this into consideration. Misuse of substances is more likely to lead to tolerance, where someone then needs more of the substance to feel the same effect. With increased use, this is where someone is at risk for dependence, addiction, and overdose. Mixing substances heightens the negative effects of each substance. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), mixing stimulants and depressants can increase “…risk of death from stroke, heart attack, aneurysm, or respiratory failure.” Furthermore, with illicit use there is a high possibility substances are mixed with unknown substances. In recent years, there has been an increase of synthetic opioids, like fentanyl, which further increases the risk of overdose and death.

Treatment

Both Adderall and Xanax have a high risk for misuse and addiction. While severity will vary, it’s important to seek professional, medical help. Withdrawal can be severe, which makes it difficult to do so without proper help. After continued misuse, someone will likely be increasing the dosages to maintain the same effects which leads to more dangerous consequences. A lot of people use Adderall and Xanax, legally or illegally, intending often to feel the benefits like less anxiety or increased concentration. Not everyone understands the inherent risk of using each drug, even with proper use. Because of this, they may find themselves dealing with abuse and addiction without realizing it.

If you or a loved one needs help, reach out today.

FAQs

How long does Xanax stay in your system?

Xanax is a short-acting drug, which means it will enter the body quickly and leave quickly. The effects of Xanax are immediate and can last up to 11 hours. This can vary depending on the prescription and amount taken. It’s possible to detect Xanax through testing for up to a week after use, though this can of course vary depending on length of use, dosage, and other factors unique to each person. The type of testing will also determine whether it’s possible to detect it.

Can you overdose on Xanax?

Generally, overdose on Xanax alone is not common. However, increased dosage or mixing substances does increase the risk, which varies depending on what the effects of other substances are. Alcohol and Xanax, for example, are both depressants that can suppress breathing which is incredibly dangerous. It’s important to discuss with your care provider about how substances interact with Xanax.

What does Xanax feel like? What is the Xanax High?

Xanax works to depress an over-excited central nervous system, which is why it’s so effective in short-term treatment of anxiety and panic disorders. It also increases dopamine, which provides what many call the “Xanax High”.

How to taper off Xanax –

If you or a loved one is using Xanax legally, it’s incredibly important to follow a medical professional’s instructions for tapering off. Even if someone is using it in a recreational manner, it’s still best to seek professional help. Suddenly stopping use can cause severe side effects and withdrawal symptoms that make it difficult to quit on one’s own.

How long does Adderall stay in your system?

Generally, the effects of Adderall last for up to 6 hours, though extended-release can last for up to 12 hours. It’s possible to detect anywhere from a few days up to a week, depending on the type of test used. This can also vary for a variety of factors including dosage, length of use, and other aspects unique to each person.

Meth vs Adderall: Are they the same? Are they related?

Adderall is an amphetamine, the parent drug of methamphetamine (meth). They are both stimulants and have been used to treat similar health issues like ADHD. However, meth carries a much higher risk for addiction. Because of this, medical use is strictly monitored and infrequently prescribed.

Can you overdose on Adderall?

With proper use, an Adderall overdose is not likely. However, misuse and increased dosage raises the risk. Furthermore, mixing substances is potentially dangerous as they tend to heighten negative effects of the other. Anyone with a prescription should be sure to communicate with their provider if they use any other substances, legal or illegal.

What is the Adderall comedown like?

It’s important that anyone with a prescription does not suddenly stop without a medical professional’s care and instructions. Anyone using illicitly may also likely need professional help. Sudden cessation can cause withdrawal symptoms that include: anxiety, cravings, depression, and fatigue.

 

 

Klonopin vs. Xanax Addiction and Withdrawal

This entry was posted in Prescription and tagged , , on by .
Klonopin vs. Xanax Addiction and Withdrawal

Klonopin and Xanax are very similar drugs, but it is important to know the differences and similarities in the addictions and withdrawals of each. Understanding how these drugs work can promote a higher chance of recovery without relapse.

The Ways Klonopin And Xanax Are Similar

Klonopin and Xanax are forms of benzodiazepines used to treat anxiety and panic attacks. They are central nervous system depressants. These drugs increase gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the brain. This acid reduces activity in the parts of the brain that control emotions and rational thoughts. When someone is suffering from anxiety, these drugs will suppress the high emotions and prevent a panic attack.

People who use Klonopin or Xanax often experience similar side effects. Blurred vision, dizziness, dry mouth, drowsiness, headache, insomnia, loss of coordination, nausea, and vomiting are common side effects.

Benzodiazepines Are Commonly Abused

Klonopin, Xanax, and other benzodiazepines are the second most commonly abused drugs. The first most-abused drugs are opioids such as Oxycontin. People abuse benzos regularly for several reasons. They are the most-prescribed pharmaceuticals in the country, and thus easily accessible. Teens often get them from their family medicine cabinets. These drugs also help ease withdrawal symptoms of other drugs and alcohol. People going through withdrawal often develop an addiction to benzodiazepines as they attempt to recover from other addictions.

People often abuse benzodiazepines for their calming effect. They often use benzos with other drugs and alcohol and are especially dangerous when used with alcohol. Drinking alcohol causes or exacerbates most benzodiazepine overdoses.

Klonopin Is Also Known As Clonazepam

Klonopin is the brand name for clonazepam, which came to the market in 1975. Klonopin helps treat anxiety and panic attacks. Doctors may also prescribe it to treat bipolar disorder, seizure disorders, Tourette’s syndrome, acute psychosis, mania, sleeping disorders, alcohol withdrawal, and pain caused by trigeminal neuralgia. However, the longer someone takes Klonopin, the higher his or her tolerance becomes to the drug, making it less effective in controlling seizures.

Klonopin has a half-life of 20 to 80 hours. Users feel the peak effects between one and four hours of taking it. Klonopin’s potency makes it an addictive drug. One-third of patients taking a prescription of Klonopin for four weeks display addiction symptoms of built-up tolerance.

Xanax, aka Alprazolam

Alprazolam is the generic name for the brand of benzodiazepine known as Xanax. Physicians prescribe Xanax to treat anxiety, irritable bowel syndrome, migraines, agoraphobia, severe PMS symptoms, and pain caused by some cancers. Xanax is a faster-acting benzodiazepine than Klonopin. A user feels its peak effects an hour or two after taking the drug. The half-life of Xanax is 11 to 16 hours. Due to its fast-acting nature, a user can develop a tolerance very quickly. Some people struggling with Xanax addiction take 20 to 30 pills a day.

Withdrawal From Klonopin And Xanax

Klonopin withdrawal is like that of Xanax, but due to their different half-lives, the withdrawal timeline is slightly different. Withdrawal also depends on the dosage is taken, length of time, and whether the user takes it with other drugs or alcohol. Every person and every withdrawal is different.

Benzodiazepines are dangerous to quit cold turkey. You should always go through withdrawal in a medically supervised detox program. Withdrawal symptoms can be fatal in some instances, so it’s important that medical professionals monitor patients during detox.

Xanax Withdrawal

The major difference in withdrawal symptoms for Klonopin and Xanax is the time frame. Klonopin is a long-acting benzodiazepine, meaning that withdrawal will last longer in general, even up to years from start to finish. Xanax is a fast-acting benzo; the withdrawal symptoms of short-acting benzos are often more intense and begin sooner after the last dose.

Stage 1: Early Withdrawal

The first stage of withdrawal begins after the half-life period runs its course and the drug is out of the person’s system. This is the most dangerous point in withdrawal, and patients can experience rapid heart rate, high blood pressure, and seizures. We definitely advise medical attention during this time. In addition, the person will experience anxiety and panic attacks return with the lack of medication. Early withdrawal typically lasts a few days.

Stage 2: Acute Withdrawal

This is the most physically and emotionally painful part of withdrawal. This phase typically lasts from a couple of weeks to a couple months. People experience withdrawal symptoms, such as sweating, panic attacks, nausea, dizziness, headaches, insomnia, hallucinations, seizures, irritability, depression, and suicidal thoughts. Medically assisted detox can help relieve these symptoms.

Stage 3: Post-acute Withdrawal

Not everyone goes through the final stage of withdrawal, but for some people, it lasts for years after the detox process. Post-acute withdrawal features the resurgence of panic attacks, anxiety, and depression. When someone is addicted to benzos, the brain becomes used to having the effects every day. As a result, when someone quits benzos they revert to old issues.

Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Medications

The safest way for someone to quit using drugs like Xanax and Klonopin is to taper down their usage. Quitting cold turkey has many health risks. By tapering down the dosage over time, someone in recovery can protect their physical and mental health.

Physicians use several medications to ease the withdrawal process while someone tapers their benzodiazepine intake. Buspirone is good for people with anxiety who are struggling with benzodiazepine addiction. It doesn’t cause physical dependence and treats anxiety. The downside is that it takes two to three weeks to kick in. People will often start taking Buspirone before they start tapering benzo intake. Flumazenil treats benzo overdoses and withdrawal symptoms of long-acting benzos like Klonopin. Doctors also use it for rapid detox, as it expels benzodiazepines from the system. This can be very dangerous.

Benzodiazepine Half-Life Comparison

Although the withdrawal processes for Klonopin and Xanax are very similar, the amount of time they spend in the system is different. Klonopin has a half-life of anywhere from 20 to 80 hours, while the half-life of Xanax is about 11 to 16 hours. Other variables, such as dosage, length of abuse, and severity of addiction will change the withdrawal timeline as well.

Detox Is Scary, We’re Here To Help