Suboxone and Tramadol

Suboxone-and-Tramadol-Fight-Addiction-Now

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is a combination of two drugs: buprenorphine and naloxone and one typically ingests sublingually (placing a dissolving strip under the tongue).  

Why the combination? Well, buprenorphine is a low strength opioid which is intended to provide the user with mild pain killing relief and can also induce a euphoric high. However, it’s effects will level off with higher dosages- meaning that taking more of it will not necessarily increase the level of high you may experience. 

Naloxone (sold individually as Narcan) on the other hand is an opioid antagonist which can block the effects of buprenorphine. If the suboxone is taken as directed (i.e. not altering the medication to be crushed, snorted or injected), the naloxone will remain dormant and will not prevent the opioid from working. However, if the drug is altered, the naloxone will be released and prevent the buprenorphine from activating. This mechanism helps prevent abuse of the drug. 

What is it Suboxone for?

Suboxone helps treat people who may be dealing with an opioid dependency. The opioid present in this drug is considerably weaker than some others such as heroin, and allows users to lower their dependence without having to experience painful withdrawals.

Suboxone abuse

Given that suboxone contains naloxone which will render the opioid useless if altered in any way, snorting, injecting or inhaling this drug would be pointless. Also, attempting to do so can produce strong withdrawal symptoms for someone who is using it to taper off a stronger opioid (as they will not experience anything). Further, taking any medication in a manner inconsistent with it’s directions can lead to permanent damage to the body and should be avoided.

What is Tramadol?

Tramadol is a mild opioid when compared to other narcotics such as morphine or heroin and treats mild to moderate pain in patients. It is sold under several brand names such as Ultram, Ultram ER and ConZip. Tramadol still possesses the same qualities as other opioids and can cause users to experience a euphoric high and elevated mood, as it promotes the release of dopamine. It is also a serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) which causes a buildup of the chemical, similar to that of some antidepressants which could explain why some abuse the drug.

Tramadol can pose serious health risks when altered or abused. Chewing, crushing and snorting, or injecting the drug will cause a faster release of the drug into the bloodstream, rather than the controlled release one would experience if taken as directed. While this may provide a more instant effect and high, the sudden absorption of the drug into the body can cause an overdose and death in some severe cases. Tramadol is a central nervous system depressant which slows your heart rate and breathing, leading to an opioid induced respiratory depression and potentially death. Further, tramadol may cause serotonin syndrome due to it being a fairly powerful SRI.

What is the difference between Ultram, Ultram ER and Ultracet?

While all three drugs contain tramadol, their functions vary somewhat:

Ultram – This is your basic brand name tramadol.

Ultram ER – Ultram ER or ‘extended release’ is an altered form of tramadol which provides a slow ongoing release of the opioid into the body. This is commonly for patients experiencing chronic pain and those who need long term relief. 

Ultracet – Ultracet is a combination of tramadol and acetaminophen and typically treats patients after dental surgery or for individuals with moderate to severe pain. As expected, the tramadol will bind to the opioid receptors and prohibit the release of serotonin and norepinephrine while the acetaminophen actually increases the pain threshold of a patient. Combined, the drugs work to reduce the overall pain experienced. Ultracet can be very harmful if abused. Along with the addictive effects of the opioid, acetaminophen can cause severe liver damage if abused.

Can you take Tramadol with Suboxone?

Mixing suboxone and tramadol could have deadly effects. As we know, taking suboxone in its directed form will cause the naloxone to remain dormant and will only release the buprenorphine. The intake of two opioids at once can cause an overdose. If altered, suboxone does have the potential to completely negate the effects of both tramadol and buprenorphine making the mixture useless. Further, mixing naloxone and tramadol can lead to an increased risk of seizures.

Mixing any opioid with alcohol is incredibly dangerous as one drug will enhance the effects of the other substance. As mentioned earlier, opioids are a central nervous system depressant and alcohol is no different. Combining the two will further increase the depressive effects and can lead to respiratory depression and death. The intake of three or more drugs is categorized as polysubstance abuse and is even more dangerous. With more substances, treatment is more difficult. It’s not impossible, but it’s important to find help from a recovery center that is adequately prepared to treat each issue.

FAQs

How long does Tramadol stay in your system?

Tramadol has a half-life of around 6 hours. This means it takes roughly 6 hours for the chemical to reduce to half its initial strength. Generally, it takes around a day or two for the drug to completely leave the body. However, this is also heavily dependent on the users body composition. The ability to detect Tramadol depends on length of use and dosage. Different tests will detect it at different times.

How long does Suboxone stay in your system?

The half-life of the chemical buprenorphine, a component of suboxone, is around 37 hours. This means it takes roughly 37 hours for the chemical to reduce to half its initial strength. The length of time Suboxone stays in one’s system varies by length of use and dosage.

What is generic Suboxone?

Generic Suboxone refers to any non brand name suboxone products. Generally users will purchase this to save money as it can be around 74% cheaper than brand name Suboxone.

What are some Suboxone withdrawal symptoms?

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Depression

Suboxone-and-Tramadol-Fight-Addiction-Now

What are some Tramadol withdrawal symptoms?

  • Sweating
  • Irritability
  • Anxiety
  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea
  • Cramps

Treatment

Suboxone and tramadol both carry a high risk for addiction. Improper use can cause severe detriments to an individual’s health. If you or a loved one needs help, please reach out today.

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